Tag Archives: biorxiv

New preprint and new video on how HIV evolves drug resistance

21 Oct

Together with Alison Feder (UC Berkeley) and Kristin Harper (freelance medical writer) I have written a manuscript on HIV drug resistance evolution on triple-drug therapies.

Triple-drug therapies were introduced in the 1990s to stop the evolution of drug resistance, but especially in the first years after their introduction, drug resistance evolution still happened often in patients on these treatments. How could this be? Have a look at our video and preprint!

The video was made by Dr Sarah Engelhard. Contact her if you would like to create a video for your paper!

Preprint link: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/807560v1

 

 

We have previously made videos about related papers:

 

 

Manuscript on HIV sweeps and clonal interference posted on BioRxiv

13 Feb

Kadie-Ann Williams and I posted a new manuscript on the BioRiv. It is 30 pages with 28 figures and a supplement of 118 figures! I guess we could call it an HIV drug resistance evolution picture book!

P00089Muller

Muller plot showing clonal interference in patient 89.

Nowadays, drug resistance evolution is quite rare, but in the late 1990s, HIV populations within patients on treatment were undergoing soft sweeps, hard sweeps, clonal interference and other things. If you like sequence data, you’ll enjoy looking at our pictures!

Title: Drug resistance evolution in HIV in the late 1990s: hard sweeps, soft sweeps, clonal interference and the accumulation of drug resistance mutations

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/548198v1

Abtract

The goal of this paper is to provide examples of evolutionary dynamics of HIV within patients who are treated with antiretrovirals. We hope that the figures in this paper will be used in evolution and population genetics classes. We show a wide variety of patterns, specifically: soft sweeps, hard sweeps, softening sweeps and hardening sweeps, simultaneous sweeps, accumulation of mutations and clonal interference.

Kadie

Kadie-Ann Williams, SFSU BSc 2014, MSc 2017

Download the paper 2019WilliamsPennings2019_Feb

Download the supplemental figures 2019WilliamsPennings2019_Supplement118Patients

 

Fitness cost paper on bioRxiv

27 Jun

A little while ago we published a new manuscript on fitness costs on the bioRxiv. I’m very excited about this paper, because it is on a new topic for me (fitness costs) and we found some exciting results (for example, I never expected to find that CpG sites were so costly for HIV).

I am also excited about the paper because it is the first paper from my lab at SFSU and it is the first paper that resulted from our collaboration with Adi Stern in Tel Aviv.

The work was done by Marion Hartl (SFSU), Kristof Theys (University of Leuven and SFSU), Alison Feder (Stanford), Maoz Gelbart (University of Tel Aviv), Adi Stern (University of Tel Aviv) and myself.

F2-modeled_sels

Fig 2 from the manuscript. Selection coefficients for transitions at every nucleotide site in the pol sequence show that CpG-forming mutations are more costly than non-CpG-forming mutations and that mutations that involve a drastic amino acid change are more costly than mutations that do not.
Selection coefficients were estimated using a generalized linear model and sequence data from 160 HIV-infected patients. Shown are predicted selection coefficients for synonymous (left) and non-synonymous (right) mutations that do not involve a drastic amino acid change and either create CpG sites (green) or do not (orange). For non-synonymous mutations, predictions are also shown for mutations that do involve drastic amino acid changes and either create CpG sites (pink) or do not (blue).

 

 

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